on the re-bound

rebound

[v. ri-bound, ree-bound; n. ree-bound, ri-bound]
verb (used without object)
1.
to bound or spring back from force of impact.
2.
to recover, as from ill health or discouragement.
3.
Basketball. to gain hold of rebounds: a forward who rebounds well off the offensive board.
verb (used with object)
4.
to cause to bound back; cast back.
5.
Basketball. to gain hold of (a rebound): The guard rebounded the ball in backcourt.
noun
6.
the act of rebounding; recoil.
7.
Basketball.
a.
a ball that bounces off the backboard or the rim of the basket.
b.
an instance of gaining hold of such a ball.
8.
Ice Hockey. a puck that bounces off the gear or person of a goalkeeper attempting to make a save.
Idioms
9.
on the rebound,
a.
after bouncing off the ground, a wall, etc.: He hit the ball on the rebound.
b.
after being rejected by another: She didn't really love him; she married him on the rebound.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English (v.) < Middle French rebondir, equivalent to Old French re- re- + bondir to bound2

rebound, redound, resound.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
rebound
 
vb
1.  to spring back, as from a sudden impact
2.  to misfire, esp so as to hurt the perpetrator: the plan rebounded
 
n
3.  the act or an instance of rebounding
4.  on the rebound
 a.  in the act of springing back
 b.  informal in a state of recovering from rejection, disappointment, etc: he married her on the rebound from an unhappy love affair
 
[C14: from Old French rebondir, from re- + bondir to bound²]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

rebound
c.1300, "to spring, leap," also "return to afflict" (early 15c.), from O.Fr. rebondir "leap back, resound," from re- "back" + bondir "leap, bound" (see bound (v.)). Sense of "to spring back from force of impact" is recorded from late 14c. Sports use probably first in tennis;
basketball sense is attested from 1954. The noun is first recorded 1520s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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