originate

[uh-rij-uh-neyt]
verb (used without object), originated, originating.
1.
to take its origin or rise; begin; start; arise: The practice originated during the Middle Ages.
2.
(of a train, bus, or other public conveyance) to begin a scheduled run at a specified place: This train originates at Philadelphia.
verb (used with object), originated, originating.
3.
to give origin or rise to; initiate; invent: to originate a better method.

Origin:
1645–55; probably back formation from origination (< F) < Latin orīginātiō etymology; see origin, -ate1, ion

originable [uh-rij-uh-nuh-buhl] , adjective
origination, noun
originator, noun
self-originated, adjective
self-originating, adjective
self-origination, noun


3. See discover.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
originate (əˈrɪdʒɪˌneɪt)
 
vb
1.  to come or bring into being
2.  (US), (Canadian) (intr) (of a bus, train, etc) to begin its journey at a specified point
 
origi'nation
 
n
 
o'riginator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

originate
1653, probably a back-formation of origination (1647), from M.Fr. origination, from L. originationem (nom. originatio), from originem (see original). In first ref. it meant "to trace the origin of;" meaning "to bring into existence" is from 1657; intrans. sense of "to come
into existence" is from 1775.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

originate o·rig·i·nate (ə-rĭj'ə-nāt')
v. o·rig·i·nat·ed, o·rig·i·nat·ing, o·rig·i·nates

  1. To bring into being; create.

  2. To come into being; start.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
All in all it's a better solution, even if gasoline is the originator of the
  energy.
By the time the photons from the originator get to the receiver, only a minute
  fraction still contain the information.
Version tracking would allow ideas to be traced back to the idea's originator
  with citations inherently built into the system.
Next to the originator of a good sentence is the first quoter of it.
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