overgrateful

grateful

[greyt-fuhl]
adjective
1.
warmly or deeply appreciative of kindness or benefits received; thankful: I am grateful to you for your help.
2.
expressing or actuated by gratitude: a grateful letter.
3.
pleasing to the mind or senses; agreeable or welcome; refreshing: a grateful breeze.

Origin:
1545–55; obsolete grate pleasing (< Latin grātus) + -ful

gratefully, adverb
gratefulness, noun
overgrateful, adjective
overgratefully, adverb
overgratefulness, noun
quasi-grateful, adjective
quasi-gratefully, adverb

grateful, gratified (see synonym study at the current entry).


1. obliged, indebted. Grateful, thankful describe an appreciative attitude for what one has received. Grateful indicates a warm or deep appreciation of personal kindness as shown to one: grateful for favors; grateful to one's neighbors for help in time of trouble. Thankful indicates a disposition to express gratitude by giving thanks, as to a benefactor or to a merciful Providence; there is often a sense of deliverance as well as of appreciation: thankful that one's life was spared in an accident; thankful for the comfort of one's general situation. 3. pleasant, gratifying, satisfying.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
grateful (ˈɡreɪtfʊl)
 
adj
1.  thankful for gifts, favours, etc; appreciative
2.  showing gratitude: a grateful letter
3.  favourable or pleasant: a grateful rest
 
[C16: from obsolete grate, from Latin grātus + -ful]
 
'gratefully
 
adv
 
'gratefulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

grateful
1552, from obsolete adj. grate "agreeable, thankful," from L. gratus "pleasing" (see grace). "A most unusual formation" [Weekley]. Hard to think of another case where English uses -ful to make an adj. from an adj. Grateful Dead, the San Francisco
rock band, took its name, according to Jerry Garcia, from a dictionary entry he saw about the folk tale motif of a wanderer who gives his last penny to pay for a corpse's burial, then is magically aided by the spirit of the dead person. A different version of the concept is found in the Egyptian Book of the Dead.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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