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Constant

[kawn-stahn] /kɔ̃ˈstɑ̃/
noun
1.
Paul Henri Benjamin Balluat
[pawl ahn-ree ban-zha-man ba-lwa] /pɔl ɑ̃ˈri bɛ̃ ʒaˈmɛ̃ baˈlwa/ (Show IPA),
Estournelles de Constant, Paul.
2.
Jean Joseph Benjamin
[zhahn zhaw-zef ban-zha-man] /ʒɑ̃ ʒɔˈzɛf bɛ̃ ʒaˈmɛ̃/ (Show IPA),
1845–1902, French painter.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for p. h. b. balluat constant

constant

/ˈkɒnstənt/
adjective
1.
fixed and invariable; unchanging
2.
continual or continuous; incessant: constant interruptions
3.
resolute in mind, purpose, or affection; loyal
noun
4.
something that is permanent or unchanging
5.
a specific quantity that is always invariable: the velocity of light is a constant
6.
  1. (maths) a symbol representing an unspecified number that remains invariable throughout a particular series of operations
  2. (physics) a theoretical or experimental quantity or property that is considered invariable throughout a particular series of calculations or experiments
Derived Forms
constantly, adverb
Word Origin
C14: from Old French, from Latin constāns standing firm, from constāre to be steadfast, from stāre to stand

Constant

/French kɔ̃stɑ̃/
noun
1.
Benjamin (bɛ̃ʒamɛ̃). real name Henri Benjamin Constant de Rebecque. 1767–1830, French writer and politician: author of the psychological novel Adolphe (1816)
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for p. h. b. balluat constant

constant

adj.

late 14c., "steadfast, resolute," from Old French constant (14c.) or directly from Latin constantem (nominative constans) "standing firm, stable, steadfast, faithful," present participle of constare, from com- "together" (see com-) + stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet). Of actions and conditions from 1650s. Related: Constantly.

n.

1832 in mathematics and physics, from constant (adj.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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p. h. b. balluat constant in Medicine

constant con·stant (kŏn'stənt)
adj.

  1. Continually occurring; persistent.

  2. Unchanging in nature, value, or extent; invariable.

n.
  1. A quantity assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context.

  2. An experimental or theoretical condition, factor, or quantity that does not vary or that is regarded as invariant in specified circumstances.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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p. h. b. balluat constant in Science
constant
  (kŏn'stənt)   
  1. A quantity that is unknown but assumed to have a fixed value in a specified mathematical context.

  2. A theoretical or experimental quantity, condition, or factor that does not vary in specified circumstances. Avogadro's number and Planck's constant are examples of constants.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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p. h. b. balluat constant in Culture

constant definition


A number that appears in equations and formulas and does not vary or change. Examples are Planck's constant and the speed of light.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Slang definitions & phrases for p. h. b. balluat constant

constant

Related Terms

finagle factor


The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
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Encyclopedia Article for p. h. b. balluat constant

constant

a number, value, or object that has a fixed magnitude, physically or abstractly, as a part of a specific operation or discussion. In mathematics the term refers to a quantity (often represented by a symbol-e.g., pi, the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter) that does not change in a certain discussion or operation, or to a variable that can assume only one value. In logic it is a term with an invariant denotation (any symbol with a fixed designation, such as a connective or quantifier).

Learn more about constant with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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