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palatine1

[pal-uh-tahyn, -tin] /ˈpæl əˌtaɪn, -tɪn/
adjective
1.
having royal privileges:
a count palatine.
2.
of or pertaining to a count palatine, earl palatine, or county palatine.
3.
of or pertaining to a palace; palatial:
a palatine chapel.
4.
(initial capital letter) of or pertaining to the Palatinate.
noun
5.
a vassal exercising royal privileges in a province; a count or earl palatine.
6.
an important officer of an imperial palace.
7.
a high official of an empire.
8.
(initial capital letter) a native or inhabitant of the Palatinate.
9.
(initial capital letter) one of the seven hills on which ancient Rome was built.
10.
a shoulder cape, usually of fur or lace, formerly worn by women.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English < Medieval Latin, Latin palātīnus of the imperial house, imperial; orig., of the hill Palātium in Rome. See palace, -ine1

palatine2

[pal-uh-tahyn, -tin] /ˈpæl əˌtaɪn, -tɪn/
adjective
1.
of, near, or in the palate; palatal:
the palatine bones.
Origin
1650-60; < French palatin, -ine. See palate, -ine1

Palatine

[pal-uh-tahyn] /ˈpæl əˌtaɪn/
noun
1.
a city in NE Illinois.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for palatine

palatine1

/ˈpæləˌtaɪn/
adjective
1.
(of an individual) possessing royal prerogatives in a territory
2.
of, belonging to, characteristic of, or relating to a count palatine, county palatine, palatinate, or palatine
3.
of or relating to a palace
noun
4.
(feudal history) the lord of a palatinate
5.
any of various important officials at the late Roman, Merovingian, or Carolingian courts
6.
(in Colonial America) any of the proprietors of a palatine colony, such as Carolina
Word Origin
C15: via French from Latin palātīnus belonging to the palace, from palātium; see palace

palatine2

/ˈpæləˌtaɪn/
adjective
1.
of or relating to the palate
noun
2.
either of two bones forming the hard palate
Word Origin
C17: from French palatin, from Latin palātum palate

Palatine1

/ˈpæləˌtaɪn/
adjective
1.
of or relating to the Palatinate
noun
2.
a Palatinate

Palatine2

/ˈpæləˌtaɪn/
noun
1.
one of the Seven Hills of Rome: traditionally the site of the first settlement of Rome
adjective
2.
of, relating to, or designating this hill
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for palatine
adj.

mid-15c., from Middle French palatin (15c.) and directly from Medieval Latin palatinus "of the palace" (of the Caesars), from Latin palatium (see palace). Used in English to indicate quasi-royal authority. Reference to the Rhineland state is from c.1580.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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palatine in Medicine

palatine pal·a·tine (pāl'ə-tīn')
adj.
Of or relating to the palate.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Article for palatine

Palatine

village, Cook county, northeastern Illinois, U.S. Palatine is a suburb of Chicago, lying about 30 miles (50 km) northwest of the city. The community, established in 1855 when a Chicago and North Western Railway siding and depot was built, was named for Palatine, New York, the original hometown of one of the early settlers. Manufactures include outdoor grills, electrical products, adhesives, and safety equipment. William Rainey Harper (community) College was established there in 1965. Attractions include the restored George Clayson House (built 1873), which contains a local history museum. Inc. 1866. Pop. (1990) 39,253; (2000) 65,479.

Learn more about Palatine with a free trial on Britannica.com

any of diverse officials found in numerous countries of medieval and early modern Europe. Originally the term was applied to the chamberlains and troops guarding the palace of the Roman emperor. In Constantine's time (early 4th century), the designation was also used for the senior field force of the army that might accompany the emperor on his campaigns

Learn more about palatine with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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