paling fence

paling

[pey-ling]
noun
1.
Also called paling fence. picket fence.
2.
a pale or picket for a fence.
3.
pales collectively.
4.
the act of building a fence with pales.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English; see pale2, -ing1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

picket fence

noun
a fence consisting of pickets or pales nailed to horizontal stringers between upright posts.
Also called paling, paling fence.


Origin:
1790–1800, Americanism

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
paling (ˈpeɪlɪŋ)
 
n
1.  a fence made of pales
2.  pales collectively
3.  a single pale
4.  the act of erecting pales

picket fence
 
n
a fence consisting of pickets supported at close regular intervals by being driven into the ground, by interlacing with strong wire, or by nailing to horizontal timbers fixed to posts in the ground

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pale
c.1300, from O.Fr. paile, from L. pallidus "pale, pallid, wan," from pallere "be pale, grow pale," from PIE *pol-/*pel- (see pallor). The verb is first recorded c.1300. Pale-face, supposed N.Amer. Indian word for "European," is attested from 1822.

pale
early 14c., "fence of pointed stakes," from L. palus "stake," related to pangere "to fix or fasten" (see pact). Figurative sense of "limit, boundary, restriction" is from c.1400. Barely surviving in beyond the pale and similar phrases. Meaning "the part of Ireland under English rule" is from 1540s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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