par-lour

parlour

[pahr-ler]
noun, adjective Chiefly British.

See -or1.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
parlour or (US) parlor (ˈpɑːlə)
 
n
1.  old-fashioned a living room, esp one kept tidy for the reception of visitors
2.  a reception room in a priest's house, convent, etc
3.  a small room for guests away from the public rooms in an inn, club, etc
4.  chiefly (US), (Canadian), (NZ) a room or shop equipped as a place of business: a billiard parlor
5.  (Caribbean) a small shop, esp one selling cakes and nonalcoholic drinks
6.  Also called: milking parlour a building equipped for the milking of cows
 
[C13: from Anglo-Norman parlur, from Old French parleur room in convent for receiving guests, from parler to speak; see parley]
 
parlor or (US) parlor
 
n
 
[C13: from Anglo-Norman parlur, from Old French parleur room in convent for receiving guests, from parler to speak; see parley]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Parlour definition


(from the Fr. parler, "to speak") denotes an "audience chamber," but that is not the import of the Hebrew word so rendered. It corresponds to what the Turks call a kiosk, as in Judg. 3:20 (the "summer parlour"), or as in the margin of the Revised Version ("the upper chamber of cooling"), a small room built on the roof of the house, with open windows to catch the breeze, and having a door communicating with the outside by which persons seeking an audience may be admitted. While Eglon was resting in such a parlour, Ehud, under pretence of having a message from God to him, was admitted into his presence, and murderously plunged his dagger into his body (21, 22). The "inner parlours" in 1 Chr. 28:11 were the small rooms or chambers which Solomon built all round two sides and one end of the temple (1 Kings 6:5), "side chambers;" or they may have been, as some think, the porch and the holy place. In 1 Sam. 9:22 the Revised Version reads "guest chamber," a chamber at the high place specially used for sacrificial feasts.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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