paradigm

[par-uh-dahym, -dim]
noun
1.
Grammar.
a.
a set of forms all of which contain a particular element, especially the set of all inflected forms based on a single stem or theme.
b.
a display in fixed arrangement of such a set, as boy, boy's, boys, boys'.
2.
an example serving as a model; pattern. mold, standard; ideal, paragon, touchstone.
3.
a.
a framework containing the basic assumptions, ways of thinking, and methodology that are commonly accepted by members of a scientific community.
b.
such a cognitive framework shared by members of any discipline or group: the company’s business paradigm.

Origin:
1475–85; < Late Latin paradīgma < Greek parádeigma pattern (verbid of paradeiknýnai to show side by side), equivalent to para- para-1 + deik-, base of deiknýnai to show (see deictic) + -ma noun suffix

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World English Dictionary
paradigm (ˈpærəˌdaɪm)
 
n
1.  grammar the set of all the inflected forms of a word or a systematic arrangement displaying these forms
2.  a pattern or model
3.  a typical or stereotypical example (esp in the phrase paradigm case)
4.  (in the philosophy of science) a very general conception of the nature of scientific endeavour within which a given enquiry is undertaken
 
[C15: via French and Latin from Greek paradeigma pattern, from paradeiknunai to compare, from para-1 + deiknunai to show]
 
paradigmatic
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

paradigm
late 15c., from L.L. paradigma "pattern, example," especially in grammar, from Gk. paradeigma "pattern, model," from paradeiknynai "exhibit, represent," lit. "show side by side," from para- "beside" + deiknynai "to show" (cognate with L. dicere "to show;" see diction). Related: Paradigmatic.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Maybe if you got out of the paradigm you're stuck in you'd see things for how
  they really are.
Wikipedia is a new paradigm in human discourse.
Some are still trying to adjust to the new paradigm.
Arabic has a much more elaborate verb paradigm.
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