Parkinson disease

Parkinson's disease

noun Pathology.
a common neurologic disease believed to be caused by deterioration of the brain cells that produce dopamine, occurring primarily after the age of 60, characterized by tremors, especially of the fingers and hands, muscle rigidity, shuffling gait, slow speech, and a masklike facial expression.
Also, Parkinson disease.
Also called Parkinson’s,, parkinsonism.


Origin:
named after James Parkinson (1755–1824), English physician who first described it

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World English Dictionary
Parkinson's disease (ˈpɑːkɪnsənz)
 
n
Often shortened to: Parkinson's, Parkinsonism, Parkinson's syndrome, paralysis agitans, Also called: shaking palsy a progressive chronic disorder of the central nervous system characterized by impaired muscular coordination and tremor
 
[C19: named after James Parkinson (1755--1824), British surgeon, who first described it]

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Word Origin & History

Parkinson's disease
1877, from Fr. maladie de Parkinson (1876), named for Eng. physician James Parkinson (1755-1824), who described it (1817) under the names shaking palsy and paralysis agitans.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

Parkinson's disease Par·kin·son's disease (pär'kĭn-sənz)
n.
A progressive nervous disease occurring most often after the age of 50, associated with the destruction of brain cells that produce dopamine, and characterized by muscular tremor, slowing of movement, partial facial paralysis, peculiarity of gait and posture, and weakness. Also called paralysis agitans.

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Science Dictionary
Parkinson's disease   (pär'kĭn-sənz)  Pronunciation Key 
A progressive neurologic disease occurring most often after the age of 50, associated with the destruction of brain cells that produce dopamine. Individuals with Parkinson's disease exhibit tremors while at rest, slowing of movement, stiffening of gait and posture, and weakness. The disease is named after its discoverer, British physician and paleontologist James Parkinson (1755-1824).
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

Parkinson's disease definition


A chronic disease of the nervous system that usually strikes in late adult life, resulting in a gradual decrease in muscle control. Symptoms of the disease include shaking, weakness, and partial paralysis of the face. Certain drugs can help alleviate some of its symptoms.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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