pater noster

paternoster

[pey-ter-nos-ter, pah‐, pat-er‐]
noun
1.
(often initial capital letter) . Also, Pater Noster. the Lord's Prayer, especially in the Latin form.
2.
a recitation of this prayer as an act of worship.
3.
one of certain beads in a rosary, regularly every 11th bead, differing in size or material from the rest and indicating that the Lord's Prayer is to be said.
4.
any fixed recital of words used as a prayer or magical charm.
5.
a doorless, continuously moving elevator for passengers or goods, having numerous platforms or compartments that rise or descend on a moving chain.
6.
(initial capital letter) Architecture, pearl molding.

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English, Old English: Lord's prayer < Latin pater noster our father, its first two words in the Vulgate (Matthew VI: 9

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To pater noster
Collins
World English Dictionary
paternoster (ˌpætəˈnɒstə)
 
n
1.  RC Church the beads at the ends of each decade of the rosary marking the points at which the Paternoster is recited
2.  any fixed form of words used as a prayer or charm
3.  Also called: paternoster line a type of fishing tackle in which short lines and hooks are attached at intervals to the main line
4.  a type of lift in which platforms are attached to continuous chains. The lift does not stop at each floor but passengers enter while it is moving
 
[Latin, literally: our father (from the opening of the Lord's Prayer)]

Paternoster (ˌpætəˈnɒstə)
 
n
1.  the Lord's Prayer, esp in Latin
2.  the recital of this as an act of devotion
 
[see paternoster]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

paternoster
"the Lord's Prayer," O.E. Pater Noster, from L. pater noster "our father," first words of the Lord's Prayer in Latin. Meaning "set of rosary beads" first recorded mid-13c. Paternoster Row, near St. Paul's in London (similarly named streets are found in other cathedral cities), reflects the once-important
industry of rosary bead-making.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature