pave the way for

pave

[peyv]
verb (used with object), paved, paving.
1.
to cover or lay (a road, walk, etc.) with concrete, stones, bricks, tiles, wood, or the like, so as to make a firm, level surface.
noun
2.
Southern Louisiana. a paved road.
Idioms
3.
pave the way to/for, to prepare for and facilitate the entrance of; lead up to: His analysis of the college market paved the way for their entry into textbook publishing.

Origin:
1275–1325; Middle English paven < Middle French paver < Vulgar Latin *pavare, for Latin pavīre to beat, ram, tread down

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
pave (peɪv)
 
vb
1.  to cover (a road, path, etc) with a firm surface suitable for travel, as with paving stones or concrete
2.  to serve as the material for a pavement or other hard layer: bricks paved the causeway
3.  (often foll by with) to cover with a hard layer (of): shelves paved with marble
4.  to prepare or make easier (esp in the phrase pave the way): to pave the way for future development
 
[C14: from Old French paver, from Latin pavīre to ram down]
 
'paver
 
n

pavé (ˈpæveɪ)
 
n
1.  a paved surface, esp an uneven one
2.  a style of setting gems so closely that no metal shows

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pave
c.1310, "to cover with a pavement," from O.Fr. paver (12c.), from V.L. *pavare, from L. pavire "to beat, ram, tread down," from PIE *pau- "to cut, strike, stamp" (cf. L. putare "to prune"). The fig. sense of to pave the way is attested from 1585.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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