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peak2

[peek] /pik/
verb (used without object)
1.
to become weak, thin, and sickly.
Origin
1500-1510
1500-10; origin uncertain
Related forms
peakish, adjective
peakishly, adverb
peakishness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for pea kish

peak

/piːk/
noun
1.
a pointed end, edge, or projection the peak of a roof
2.
the pointed summit of a mountain
3.
a mountain with a pointed summit
4.
the point of greatest development, strength, etc the peak of his career
5.
  1. a sharp increase in a physical quantity followed by a sharp decrease a voltage peak
  2. the maximum value of this quantity
  3. (as modifier) peak voltage
6.
Also called visor. a projecting piece on the front of some caps
7.
  1. See widow's peak
  2. the pointed end of a beard
8.
(nautical)
  1. the extreme forward (forepeak) or aft (afterpeak) part of the hull
  2. (of a fore-and-aft quadrilateral sail) the after uppermost corner
  3. the after end of a gaff
verb
9.
(transitive) (nautical) to set (a gaff) or tilt (oars) vertically
10.
to form or reach or cause to form or reach a peak or maximum
adjective
11.
of or relating to a period of highest use or demand, as for watching television, commuting, etc peak viewing hours, peak time
Derived Forms
peaky, peakish, adjective
Word Origin
C16: perhaps from pike², influenced by beak1; compare Spanish pico, French pic, Middle Low German pēk
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for pea kish
peak
"pointed top," 1530, variant of pike (2) "sharp point." Meaning "top of a mountain" first recorded 1634, though pike was used in this sense c.1400. Figurative sense is 1784. Meaning "point formed by hair on the forehead" is from 1833. The verb is first recorded 1577, in sense of "to rise in a peak;" meaning "reach highest point" first recorded 1958. The Peak in Derbyshire is O.E. Peaclond, apparently a reference to elf-denizen Peac "Puck."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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