pectus excavatum

Medical Dictionary

pectus excavatum pectus ex·ca·va·tum (ěk'skə-vā'təm)
n.
See funnel chest.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

pectus excavatum

a chest deformity caused by depression of the breastbone, or sternum. Pectus excavatum is generally not noticeable at birth but becomes more evident with age unless surgically corrected. In most instances the abnormality is due to a shortened central tendon of the diaphragm, the muscular partition between the chest and the abdominal cavity. It may also result from displacement of the heart to the left of mid-chest or from excessive pulling downward by the diaphragm. Corrective surgery is best performed in early childhood. The heart and lungs are most affected by pectus excavatum. The heart is displaced to the left, there is more pressure on the heart, and the respiratory movements of the lungs are impaired. In severe deformations, the effects can include breathlessness upon exertion, pain around the heart, and dizziness.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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