pedagogic

[ped-uh-goj-ik, -goh-jik]
adjective
of or pertaining to a pedagogue or pedagogy.
Also, pedagogical.


Origin:
1775–85; < Greek paidagōgikós of a child's tutor. See pedagogue, -ic

pedagogically, adverb
nonpedagogic, adjective
nonpedagogical, adjective
nonpedagogically, adverb
unpedagogic, adjective
unpedagogically, adverb
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
pedagogue or pedagog (ˈpɛdəˌɡɒɡ)
 
n
1.  a teacher or educator
2.  a pedantic or dogmatic teacher
 
[C14: from Latin paedagōgus, from Greek paidagōgos slave who looked after his master's son, from pais boy + agōgos leader]
 
pedagog or pedagog
 
n
 
[C14: from Latin paedagōgus, from Greek paidagōgos slave who looked after his master's son, from pais boy + agōgos leader]
 
peda'gogic or pedagog
 
adj
 
peda'gogical or pedagog
 
adj
 
peda'gogically or pedagog
 
adv
 
'pedagogism or pedagog
 
n
 
'pedagoguism or pedagog
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pedagogical
1610s, from L. paedagogicus, from Gk. paidagogikos, from paidagogos "teacher" (see pedagogue).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Moreover, reform textbooks may believe in inquiry approaches but teachers are
  the ones that make pedagogical decisions.
Its motive is probably pedagogical.
At the time, this seemed like a brilliant pedagogical approach.
Not surprisingly, he favors the use of computer games and simulations as the
  proper pedagogical method for digital natives.
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