pedantry

[ped-n-tree]
noun, plural pedantries.
1.
the character, qualities, practices, etc., of a pedant, especially undue display of learning.
2.
slavish attention to rules, details, etc.
3.
an instance of being pedantic: the pedantries of modern criticism.

Origin:
1575–85; Italian pedanteria. See pedant, -ry

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World English Dictionary
pedantry (ˈpɛdəntrɪ)
 
n , pl -ries
the habit or an instance of being a pedant, esp in the display of useless knowledge or minute observance of petty rules or details

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Example sentences
The agendas of interdisciplinary conferences, as they are often called, can
  smack of pedantry and pretension.
Pedantry is a false pattern based on a lack of perspective and judgement
  regarding what is relevant and appropriate.
Engaging and often amusing, the book is serious, but without a whiff of
  pedantry.
It is not simply a matter of pedantry to be careful and scrupulous about such
  evidence.
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