pekin

pekin

[pee-kin]
noun (often initial capital letter)
a silk fabric in which broad stripes of equal width and in various colors or weaves are alternated.

Origin:
1775–85; < French pékin; after Peking

Dictionary.com Unabridged

Pekin

[pee-kin]
noun
one of a hardy breed of yellowish-white domestic ducks, raised originally in China.

Origin:
1880–85; after Peking

Pekin

[pee-kin]
noun
a city in central Illinois.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
Pekin (piːˈkɪn)
 
n
a breed of white or cream duck with a bright orange bill
 
[C18: via French from Peking]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

pekin

city, seat (1849) of Tazewell county, central Illinois, U.S. It lies along the Illinois River (bridged) just south of Peoria. French explorers wintered in the area in 1680. The first settler was Jonathan Tharp in 1824. Tharp opened a smokehouse in 1827, and in 1829 the town was laid out and named Pekin by the wife of Nathan Cromwell, one of the city's founders, for Peking (Beijing), China. Pekin's first schoolhouse (Snell School) was opened in 1831 and fortified during the Black Hawk War (1832) as Fort Doolittle. Pekin's economy was for many years based on the steamboat trade. Abraham Lincoln argued many cases in its courthouse, as did Stephen A. Douglas and David Davis. The city was the birthplace and home of U.S. Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen, who is buried there.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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