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pelt1

[pelt] /pɛlt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to attack or assail with repeated blows or with missiles.
2.
to throw (missiles).
3.
to drive by blows or missiles:
The child pelted the cows home from the fields.
4.
to assail vigorously with words, questions, etc.
5.
to beat or rush against with repeated forceful blows:
The wind and rain pelted the roofs and walls of the houses for four days.
verb (used without object)
6.
to strike blows; beat with force or violence.
7.
to throw missiles.
8.
to hurry.
9.
to beat or pound unrelentingly:
The wind, rain, and snow pelted against the castle walls.
10.
to cast abuse.
noun
11.
the act of pelting.
12.
a vigorous stroke; whack.
13.
a blow with something thrown.
14.
15.
an unrelenting or repeated beating, as of rain or wind.
Origin
1490-1500
1490-1500; origin uncertain
Related forms
unpelted, adjective

pelt2

[pelt] /pɛlt/
noun
1.
the untanned hide or skin of an animal.
2.
Facetious. the human skin.
Idioms
3.
in one's pelt, Facetious. naked.
Origin
1275-1325; Middle English; perhaps back formation from peltry; compare Old French pelete, derivative of Latin pellis skin
Related forms
peltish, adjective
peltless, adjective
Synonyms
1. See skin.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for pelt
  • Armored police vehicles come flying around corners toward taunting students, who pelt them with rocks.
  • And you are issued a faux leopard pelt to keep warm.
  • Falling rain, leaf shadows, the bloodied pelt of an arrowed monkey-all appear dipped in shivery tones of silver.
  • The awestruck musicians pelt him with questions about life in heaven.
  • With a brush made from the pelt of a volunteered rat.
  • He wears his hair in a greased pompadour and has a thick pelt of back hair.
  • The pelt has to slip all the way down the beam to the mink's nose.
  • Individual pelt prices are highly variable due to differences in pelt quality and stages of processing at sale.
  • When prime, fisher pelts have stiff glossy guard hairs and dense silky under fur, and the leather side of the pelt is white.
  • Raw pelt means a green pelt which has been dried, fleshed, or cured.
British Dictionary definitions for pelt

pelt1

/pɛlt/
verb
1.
(transitive) to throw (missiles) at (a person)
2.
(transitive) to hurl (insults) at (a person)
3.
(intransitive; foll by along, over, etc) to move rapidly; hurry
4.
(intransitive) often foll by down. to rain heavily
noun
5.
a blow
6.
speed (esp in the phrase at full pelt)
Derived Forms
pelter, noun
Word Origin
C15: of uncertain origin, perhaps from pellet

pelt2

/pɛlt/
noun
1.
the skin of a fur-bearing animal, such as a mink, esp when it has been removed from the carcass
2.
the hide of an animal, stripped of hair and ready for tanning
Word Origin
C15: perhaps back formation from peltry
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pelt
pelt
"to strike" (with something), c.1500, perhaps from an unrecorded O.E. *pyltan, from M.L. *pultiare, from L. pultare "to beat." Or from O.Fr. peloter "to strike with a ball," from pelote "ball" (see pellet).
pelt
"skin of a fur-bearing animal," 1425, related to earlier pel (c.1300), contraction of pelet, from O.Fr. pelete "fine skin, membrane," dim. of pel "skin," from L. pellis "skin, hide."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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