Peltier effect

Peltier effect

[pel-tyey]
noun Physics.
the change in temperature of either junction of a thermocouple when a current is maintained in the thermocouple and after allowance is made for a temperature change due to resistance.

Origin:
1855–60; named after Jean C. A. Peltier (1785–1845), French physicist who discovered it

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Peltier effect (ˈpɛltɪˌeɪ)
 
n
physics Compare Seebeck effect the production of heat at one junction and the absorption of heat at the other junction of a thermocouple when a current is passed around the thermocouple circuit. The heat produced is additional to the heat arising from the resistance of the wires
 
[C19: named after Jean Peltier (1785--1845), French physicist, who discovered it]

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peltier effect

the cooling of one junction and the heating of the other when electric current is maintained in a circuit of material consisting of two dissimilar conductors; the effect is even stronger in circuits containing dissimilar semiconductors. In a circuit consisting of a battery joined by two pieces of copper wire to a length of bismuth wire, a temperature rise occurs at the junction where the current passes from copper to bismuth, and a temperature drop occurs at the junction where the current passes from bismuth to copper. This effect was discovered in 1834 by the French physicist Jean-Charles-Athanase Peltier

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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