pelvic girdle

pelvic girdle

noun
1.
(in vertebrates) a bony or cartilaginous arch supporting the hind limbs or analogous parts.
2.
(in humans) the arch formed by the ilium, ischium, and pubis. See illus. under pelvis.
Also called pelvic arch.


Origin:
1885–90

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
pelvic girdle or pelvic arch
 
n
the skeletal structure to which the lower limbs in man, and the hind limbs or corresponding parts in other vertebrates, are attached
 
pelvic arch or pelvic arch
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

pelvic girdle n.
A bony or cartilaginous structure in vertebrates, attached to and supporting the hind limbs or fins. Also called pelvic arch.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

pelvic girdle

in human anatomy, basin-shaped complex of bones that connects the trunk and legs, supports and balances the trunk, and contains and supports the intestines, urinary bladder, and internal sex organs. The pelvic girdle consists of paired hipbones, connected in front at the pubic symphysis and behind by the sacrum; each is made up of three bones-the blade-shaped ilium, above and to either side, which accounts for the width of the hips; the ischium, behind and below, on which the weight falls in sitting; and the pubis, in front. All three unite in early adulthood at a triangular suture in the acetabulum, the cup-shaped socket that forms the hip joint with the head of the femur (thighbone). The ring made by the pelvic girdle functions as the birth canal in females. The pelvis provides attachment for muscles that balance and support the trunk and move the legs, hips, and trunk. In the infant the pelvis is narrow and nonsupportive. As the child begins walking, the pelvis broadens and tilts, the sacrum descends deeper into its articulation with the ilia, and the lumbar curve develops.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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