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Penny

[pen-ee] /ˈpɛn i/
noun
1.
a female given name, form of Penelope.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for pennys
Historical Examples
  • The pennys, like many another comparatively obscure name, went far back into the primeval soil of civilization.

    The Three Black Pennys Joseph Hergesheimer
  • Books are kept, and every penny or pennys worth accounted for.

  • You see, the pennys, some hundreds of years back, acquired a strong Welsh strain.

    The Three Black Pennys Joseph Hergesheimer
  • To give the to-drink before to start, and each one the same—six pennys.

  • For our cranberries, we were to go on a mile further, to a farm on the slope of the next hill, the pennys.

    A Northern Countryside Rosalind Richards
  • Yet colouring all was the other, the black Welsh blood of the pennys.

    The Three Black Pennys Joseph Hergesheimer
  • The pennys' position in the Province, too, was high; the most exclusive assemblies were open to them.

    The Three Black Pennys Joseph Hergesheimer
  • Sister Nash brought twenty-three cents all in pennys, tied up in the corner of a old handkercif.

    Samantha Among the Brethren, Part 7. Josiah Allen's Wife (Marietta Holley)
  • Mariana was unable to discover a souvenir of the generations of pennys that had filled the rooms with the stir of their living.

    The Three Black Pennys Joseph Hergesheimer
  • Nobody who knew you or your mother would have accused you of taking a pennys worth that didnt rightfully belong to you.

British Dictionary definitions for pennys

penny

/ˈpɛnɪ/
noun (pl) pennies, pence (pɛns)
1.
Also called (formerly) new penny. (in Britain) a bronze coin having a value equal to one hundredth of a pound p
2.
(in Britain before 1971) a bronze or copper coin having a value equal to one twelfth of a shilling or one two-hundred-and-fortieth of a pound d
3.
a former monetary unit of the Republic of Ireland worth one hundredth of a pound
4.
(pl) pennies. (in the US and Canada) a cent
5.
a coin of similar value, as used in several other countries
6.
(used with a negative) (informal, mainly Brit) the least amount of money: I don't have a penny
7.
(informal, mainly Brit) a bad penny, an objectionable person or thing (esp in the phrase turn up like a bad penny)
8.
(informal) a pretty penny, a considerable sum of money
9.
(Brit, informal) spend a penny, to urinate
10.
(informal, mainly Brit) the penny dropped, the explanation of something was finally realized
11.
two a penny, plentiful but of little value
Word Origin
Old English penig, pening; related to Old Saxon penni(n)g, Old High German pfeni(n)c, German Pfennig
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pennys

penny

n.

Old English pening, penig, Northumbrian penning "penny," from Proto-Germanic *panninggaz (cf. Old Norse penningr, Swedish pänning, Danish penge, Old Frisian panning, Old Saxon pending, Middle Dutch pennic, Dutch penning, Old High German pfenning, German Pfennig, not recorded in Gothic, where skatts is used instead), of unknown origin.

Offa's reformed coinage on light, broad flans is likely to have begun c.760-5 in London, with an awareness of developments in Francia and East Anglia. ... The broad flan penny established by Offa remained the principal denomination, with only minor changes, until the fourteenth century. [Anna Gannon, "The Iconography of Early Anglo-Saxon Coinage," Oxford, 2003]
The English coin was originally set at one-twelfth of a shilling and was of silver, later copper, then bronze. There are two plural forms: pennies of individual coins, pence collectively. In translations it rendered various foreign coins of small denomination, especially Latin denarius, whence comes its abbreviation d.

As American English colloquial for cent, it is recorded from 1889. Penny-a-liner "writer for a journal or newspaper" is attested from 1834. Penny dreadful "cheap and gory fiction" dates from c.1870. Phrase penny-wise and pound-foolish is recorded from c.1600. Penny-pincher "miserly person" is recorded from 1906 (as an adjective penny-pinching is recorded from 1858, American English). Penny loafers attested from 1960.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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pennys in the Bible

(Gr. denarion), a silver coin of the value of about 7 1/2d. or 8d. of our present money. It is thus rendered in the New Testament, and is more frequently mentioned than any other coin (Matt. 18:28; 20:2, 9, 13; Mark 6:37; 14:5, etc.). It was the daily pay of a Roman soldier in the time of Christ. In the reign of Edward III. an English penny was a labourer's day's wages. This was the "tribute money" with reference to which our Lord said, "Whose image and superscription is this?" When they answered, "Caesar's," he replied, "Render therefore to Caesar the things that are Caesar's; and to God the things that are God's" (Matt. 22:19; Mark 12:15).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Idioms and Phrases with pennys
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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