per-suasion

persuasion

[per-swey-zhuhn]
noun
1.
the act of persuading or seeking to persuade.
2.
the power of persuading; persuasive force.
3.
the state or fact of being persuaded or convinced.
4.
a deep conviction or belief.
5.
a form or system of belief, especially religious belief: the Quaker persuasion.
6.
a sect, group, or faction holding or advocating a particular belief, idea, ideology, etc.: Several of the people present are of the socialist persuasion.
7.
Facetious. kind or sort.

Origin:
1350–1400; late Middle English < Latin persuāsiōn- (stem of persuāsiō; see per-, suasion); replacing Middle English persuacioun < Middle French persuacion < Latin, as above

prepersuasion, noun
self-persuasion, noun


1. See advice.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
persuasion (pəˈsweɪʒən)
 
n
1.  the act of persuading or of trying to persuade
2.  the power to persuade
3.  the state of being persuaded; strong belief
4.  an established creed or belief, esp a religious one
5.  a sect, party, or faction
 
[C14: from Latin persuāsiō; see persuade]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

persuasion
late 14c., "action of inducing (someone) to believe (something)," from O.Fr. persuasion (14c.), from L. persuasionem (nom. persuasio) "a convincing, persuading," from persuadere "persuade," from per- "thoroughly, strongly" + suadere "to urge, persuade," from PIE *swad-. Meaning "religious belief, creed"
is from 1620s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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