perpetual

[per-pech-oo-uhl]
adjective
1.
continuing or enduring forever; everlasting.
2.
lasting an indefinitely long time: perpetual snow.
3.
continuing or continued without intermission or interruption; ceaseless: a perpetual stream of visitors all day.
4.
blooming almost continuously throughout the season or the year.
noun
5.
a hybrid rose that is perpetual.
6.
a perennial plant.

Origin:
1300–50; late Middle English perpetuall < Latin perpetuālis permanent, equivalent to perpetu(us) uninterrupted (per- per- + pet-, base of petere to seek, reach for + -uus deverbal adj. suffix) + -ālis -al1; replacing Middle English perpetuel < Middle French < Latin as above

perpetuality, perpetualness, noun
perpetually, adverb
nonperpetual, adjective
nonperpetually, adverb
quasi-perpetual, adjective
quasi-perpetually, adverb


1. permanent, enduring. See eternal. 3. continuous, incessant, constant, unending, uninterrupted.


1. temporary. 3. discontinuous.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
perpetual (pəˈpɛtjʊəl)
 
adj
1.  (usually prenominal) eternal; permanent
2.  (usually prenominal) seemingly ceaseless because often repeated: your perpetual complaints
3.  horticulture blooming throughout the growing season or year
 
n
4.  (of a crop plant) continually producing edible parts: perpetual spinach
5.  a plant that blooms throughout the growing season
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin perpetuālis universal, from perpes continuous, from per- (thoroughly) + petere to go towards]
 
per'petually
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

perpetual
mid-14c., from O.Fr. perpetuel (12c.), from L. perpetualis "universal," in M.L. "permanent," from perpetuus "continuous, universal," from perpetis, gen. of Old L. perpes "lasting," probably from per- "through" + root of petere "to seek, go to, aim at" (see petition). Perpetual
motion is attested from 1590s.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Forget about that perpetual grin made famous by “Flipper” in the
  60s.
Another perpetual concern is the volume of e-mail that arrives at the
  individual sites.
Believe it or not it is a perpetual power machine.
In areas where there is a perpetual moisture problem, do not install carpeting.
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