philosophy

[fi-los-uh-fee]
noun, plural philosophies.
1.
the rational investigation of the truths and principles of being, knowledge, or conduct.
2.
any of the three branches, namely natural philosophy, moral philosophy, and metaphysical philosophy, that are accepted as composing this study.
3.
a particular system of thought based on such study or investigation: the philosophy of Spinoza.
4.
the critical study of the basic principles and concepts of a particular branch of knowledge, especially with a view to improving or reconstituting them: the philosophy of science.
5.
a system of principles for guidance in practical affairs.
6.
an attitude of rationality, patience, composure, and calm in the presence of troubles or annoyances.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English philosophie < Latin philosophia < Greek philosophía. See philo-, -sophy

antiphilosophy, adjective, noun, plural antiphilosophies.
nonphilosophy, noun, plural nonphilosophies.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
philosophy (fɪˈlɒsəfɪ)
 
n , pl -phies
1.  the academic discipline concerned with making explicit the nature and significance of ordinary and scientific beliefs and investigating the intelligibility of concepts by means of rational argument concerning their presuppositions, implications, and interrelationships; in particular, the rational investigation of the nature and structure of reality (metaphysics), the resources and limits of knowledge (epistemology), the principles and import of moral judgment (ethics), and the relationship between language and reality (semantics)
2.  the particular doctrines relating to these issues of some specific individual or school: the philosophy of Descartes
3.  the critical study of the basic principles and concepts of a discipline: the philosophy of law
4.  archaic, literary or the investigation of natural phenomena, esp alchemy, astrology, and astronomy
5.  any system of belief, values, or tenets
6.  a personal outlook or viewpoint
7.  serenity of temper
 
[C13: from Old French filosofie, from Latin philosophia, from Greek, from philosophos lover of wisdom]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

philosophy
c.1300, from O.Fr. filosofie (12c.), from L. philosophia, from Gk. philosophia "love of knowledge, wisdom," from philo- "loving" + sophia "knowledge, wisdom," from sophis "wise, learned."
Nec quicquam aliud est philosophia, si interpretari velis, praeter studium sapientiae; sapientia autem est rerum divinarum et humanarum causarumque quibus eae res continentur scientia. [Cicero, "De Officiis"]
Meaning "system a person forms for conduct of life" is attested from 1771. Philosophize is attested from 1594.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary

philosophy definition


A study that attempts to discover the fundamental principles of the sciences, the arts, and the world that the sciences and arts deal with; the word philosophy is from the Greek for “love of wisdom.” Philosophy has many branches that explore principles of specific areas, such as knowledge (epistemology), reasoning (logic), being in general (metaphysics), beauty (aesthetics), and human conduct (ethics).

Different approaches to philosophy are also called philosophies. (See also epicureanism, existentialism, idealism, materialism, nihilism, pragmatism, stoicism, and utilitarianism.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

philosophy definition


See computer ethics, liar paradox, netiquette, proof.

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
But he didn't see his use of new technology as core to his teaching philosophy.
Generally, philosophy is derived by individuals, with varying input.
This is the central idea of Gandhian philosophy.
Being a philosopher to myself, I see philosophy as a means of accepting life.
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