phosphore

Phosphor

[fos-fer, -fawr]
noun
the morning star, especially Venus.
Also, Phosphore [fos-fawr, -fohr] , Phosphorus.


Origin:
1625–35; < Latin Phōsphorus < Greek Phōsphóros the morning star, literally, the light-bringing one, equivalent to phôs light + -phoros bringing; see -phorous

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World English Dictionary
phosphor (ˈfɒsfə)
 
n
a substance, such as the coating on a cathode-ray tube, capable of emitting light when irradiated with particles or electromagnetic radiation
 
[C17: from French, ultimately from Greek phōsphorosphosphorus]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

phosphor- pref.
Variant of phosphoro-.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
phosphor   (fŏs'fər)  Pronunciation Key 
Any of various substances that can emit light after absorbing some form of radiation. Television screens and fluorescent lamp tubes are coated on the inside with phosphors. See Note at cathode-ray tube.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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