pianoforte

[pee-an-uh-fawrt, -fohrt; pee-an-uh-fawr-tee, -tey, -fohr-]
noun
a piano.

Origin:
1760–70; < Italian (gravecembalo col) piano e forte literally, (harpsicord with) soft and loud, equivalent to piano soft (see piano2) + forte loud (see forte2)

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World English Dictionary
pianoforte (pɪˈænəʊˈfɔːtɪ)
 
n
the full name for piano
 
[C18: from Italian, originally (gravecembalo col) piano e forte (harpsichord with) soft and loud; see piano², forte²]

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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pianoforte
1767, from It., from piano e forte "soft and loud," in full, gravicembalo col piano e forte "harpsichord with soft and loud" (c.1710), so called by inventor B. Cristofori (1655-1731) of Padua because the ability via dampers to vary the tone is one of the main changes from the harpsichord.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
pianoforte [(pee-an-uh-fawrt, pee-an-uh-fawr-tay)]

The full name of the piano, the common musical instrument with a board of black and white keys, eighty-eight in all. The keys operate hammers that strike wires. Pianoforte is Italian for “soft-loud”; it received this name because its level of loudness depends on how hard the player strikes the keys.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
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Example sentences
The parlors showcase original mahogany and rosewood furniture, along with a rare upright pianoforte.
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