piratelike

pirate

[pahy-ruht]
noun
1.
a person who robs or commits illegal violence at sea or on the shores of the sea.
2.
a ship used by such persons.
3.
any plunderer, predator, etc.: confidence men, slumlords, and other pirates.
4.
a person who uses or reproduces the work or invention of another without authorization.
5.
Also called pirate stream. Geology. a stream that diverts into its own flow the headwaters of another stream, river, etc.
verb (used with object), pirated, pirating.
6.
to commit piracy upon; plunder; rob.
7.
to take by piracy: to pirate gold.
8.
to use or reproduce (a book, an invention, etc.) without authorization or legal right: to pirate hit records.
9.
to take or entice away for one's own use: Our competitor is trying to pirate our best salesman.
verb (used without object), pirated, pirating.
10.
to commit or practice piracy.

Origin:
1250–1300; Middle English < Latin pīrāta < Greek peirātḗs, equivalent to peirā-, variant stem of peirân to attack + -tēs agent noun suffix

piratelike, adjective
piratical [pahy-rat-i-kuhl, pi-] , piratic, adjective
piratically, adverb
unpirated, adjective
unpiratical, adjective
unpiratically, adverb


1. freebooter, buccaneer, corsair, plunderer.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
pirate (ˈpaɪrɪt)
 
n
1.  a person who commits piracy
2.  a.  a vessel used by pirates
 b.  (as modifier): a pirate ship
3.  a person who illicitly uses or appropriates someone else's literary, artistic, or other work
4.  a.  a person or group of people who broadcast illegally
 b.  (as modifier): a pirate radio station
 
vb
5.  (tr) to use, appropriate, or reproduce (artistic work, ideas, etc) illicitly
 
[C15: from Latin pīrāta, from Greek peirātēs one who attacks, from peira an attempt, attack]
 
piratical
 
adj
 
pi'ratic
 
adj
 
pi'ratically
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pirate
1254, from O.Fr. pirate, from L. pirata "sailor, sea robber," from Gk. peirates "brigand, pirate," lit. "one who attacks," from peiran "to attack, make a hostile attempt on, try," from peira "trial, an attempt, attack," from PIE base *per- "try" (cf. L. peritus "experienced," periculum "trial, experiment,
risk, danger," see peril). Meaning "one who takes another's work without permission" first recorded 1701; sense of "unlicensed radio broadcaster" is from 1913. The verb is first recorded 1574.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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