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[pley-keyt, plak-eyt] /ˈpleɪ keɪt, ˈplæk eɪt/
verb (used with object), placated, placating.
to appease or pacify, especially by concessions or conciliatory gestures:
to placate an outraged citizenry.
Origin of placate1
1670-80; < Latin plācātus past participle of plācāre to quiet, calm, appease, akin to placēre to please; see -ate1
Related forms
placater, noun
[pley-key-shuh n] /pleɪˈkeɪ ʃən/ (Show IPA),
unplacated, adjective
conciliate, satisfy. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for placation
Historical Examples
  • In Smith's theory there is confusion between the two ideas of communion and expiation or placation.

  • This was no religious rite, no placation of the brutish jungle gods.

    Jerry of the Islands Jack London
  • "I know what you mean, Lou," he said, with an affectionate attempt at placation.

    The Market-Place Harold Frederic
  • There was such a twang of temper in his voice that Crofts heard at once, and made a quick effort at placation.

    What Will People Say? Rupert Hughes
  • There is not a word of proof of the view that the placation of the deity was due to his assimilation of kindred flesh and blood.

  • For the placation of Bildad Rose there was news of a stable, not ruined beyond service, with hay in a loft, near the house.

British Dictionary definitions for placation


(transitive) to pacify or appease
Derived Forms
placation, noun
Word Origin
C17: from Latin plācāre; see placable
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for placation

1580s, from French placation (16c.), from Latin placationem (nominative placatio) "an appeasing, pacifying, quieting," noun of action from past participle stem of placare (see placate).



1670s, a back-formation from placation or else from Latin placatus "soothed, quiet, gentle, calm, peaceful," past participle of placare "to calm, appease, quiet, soothe, assuage," related to placere "to please" (see please). Related: Placated; placating; placatingly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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