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plait

[pleyt, plat] /pleɪt, plæt/
noun
1.
a braid, especially of hair or straw.
2.
a pleat or fold, as of cloth.
verb (used with object)
3.
to braid, as hair or straw.
4.
to make, as a mat, by braiding.
5.
to pleat.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English pleyt < Middle French pleit < Latin plicitum, neuter of plicitus, past participle of plicāre to fold; see ply2
Related forms
interplait, verb (used with object)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for plait
  • But it was worked into a modern, multicolored necklace with the gems hung on a hippie leather plait.
  • She'd parted it in the middle or braided it into a single plait.
  • If one of the ribbons in the plait is twisted, it gives the resulting particle an electric charge.
  • On her head were two golden-yellow tresses, in each of which was a plait of four locks, with a bead at the point of each lock.
  • They used the tough leaves of yucca plants to plait durable sandal soles.
British Dictionary definitions for plait

plait

/plæt/
noun
1.
a length of hair, ribbon, etc, that has been plaited
2.
(in Britain) a loaf of bread of several twisting or intertwining parts
3.
a rare spelling of pleat
verb
4.
(transitive) to intertwine (strands or strips) in a pattern
Word Origin
C15 pleyt, from Old French pleit, from Latin plicāre to fold; see ply²
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for plait
v.

late 14c., "to fold, gather in pleats," also "to braid or weave," from Old French pleir "to fold," variant of ploier, ployer "to fold, bend," from Latin plicare "to fold" (see ply (v.1)). Related: Plaited; plaiting.

n.

c.1400, "a fold, a crease," from Anglo-French pleit, Old French ploit, earlier pleit, "fold, manner of folding," from Latin plicatus, past participle of plicare "to lay, fold, twist" (see ply (v.1)). Meaning "interlaced strands of hair, ribbon, etc." is from 1520s, perhaps from plait (v.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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