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plausible

[plaw-zuh-buh l] /ˈplɔ zə bəl/
adjective
1.
having an appearance of truth or reason; seemingly worthy of approval or acceptance; credible; believable:
a plausible excuse; a plausible plot.
2.
well-spoken and apparently, but often deceptively, worthy of confidence or trust:
a plausible commentator.
Origin
1535-1545
1535-45; < Latin plausibilis deserving applause, equivalent to plaus(us) (past participle of plaudere to applaud) + -ibilis -ible
Related forms
plausibility, plausibleness, noun
plausibly, adverb
nonplausibility, noun
nonplausible, adjective
nonplausibleness, noun
nonplausibly, adverb
overplausible, adjective
overplausibleness, noun
overplausibly, adverb
superplausible, adjective
superplausibleness, noun
superplausibly, adverb
unplausible, adjective
unplausibleness, noun
unplausibly, adverb
Synonyms
1. Plausible, specious describe that which has the appearance of truth but might be deceptive. The person or thing that is plausible strikes the superficial judgment favorably; it may or may not be true: a plausible argument (one that cannot be verified or believed in entirely). Specious definitely implies deceit or falsehood; the surface appearances are quite different from what is beneath: a specious pretense of honesty; a specious argument (one deliberately deceptive, probably for selfish or evil purposes).
Antonyms
1. honest, sincere.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for plausibly
  • Rather, it should outline one possible dissertation, and do so plausibly.
  • In and of itself it could plausibly provide a complete path to recovery of information.
  • We thought their persistence might plausibly explain why some people are synesthetes.
  • Much worse than a good scientist communicating poorly is a non-scientist spreading pseudo-science plausibly.
  • But neither candidate could any longer plausibly claim that he or she was unambiguously the people's choice.
  • One could state that he never works from life, but he might plausibly reply that he never works from anything else.
  • But it means that responsibility for abuses can no longer be plausibly pinned on a single figure.
  • Having created this monster, the alarmists could plausibly endow it with outlandish projects and ambitions.
  • Both countries can plausibly argue that their debt loads are sustainable.
  • Even the ones that might plausibly be described as high-tech strike some investors more as high-risk.
British Dictionary definitions for plausibly

plausible

/ˈplɔːzəbəl/
adjective
1.
apparently reasonable, valid, truthful, etc: a plausible excuse
2.
apparently trustworthy or believable: a plausible speaker
Derived Forms
plausibility, plausibleness, noun
plausibly, adverb
Word Origin
C16: from Latin plausibilis worthy of applause, from plaudere to applaud
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for plausibly

plausible

adj.

1540s, "acceptable, agreeable," from Latin plausibilis "deserving applause, acceptable," from plaus-, past participle stem of plaudere "to applaud" (see plaudit). Meaning "having the appearance of truth" is recorded from 1560s. Related: Plausibly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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