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[plezh-er] /ˈplɛʒ ər/
the state or feeling of being pleased.
enjoyment or satisfaction derived from what is to one's liking; gratification; delight.
worldly or frivolous enjoyment:
the pursuit of pleasure.
recreation or amusement; diversion; enjoyment:
Are you traveling on business or for pleasure?
sensual gratification.
a cause or source of enjoyment or delight:
It was a pleasure to see you.
pleasurable quality:
the pleasure of his company.
one's will, desire, or choice:
to make known one's pleasure.
verb (used with object), pleasured, pleasuring.
to give pleasure to; gratify; please.
verb (used without object), pleasured, pleasuring.
to take pleasure; delight:
I pleasure in your company.
to seek pleasure, as by taking a holiday.
Origin of pleasure
late Middle English
1325-75; late Middle English (see please, -ure); replacing Middle English plaisir < Middle French (noun use of infinitive) < Latin placēre to please
Related forms
pleasureful, adjective
pleasureless, adjective
pleasurelessly, adverb
antipleasure, noun, adjective
1. happiness, gladness, delectation. Pleasure, enjoyment, delight, joy refer to the feeling of being pleased and happy. Pleasure is the general term: to take pleasure in beautiful scenery. Enjoyment is a quiet sense of well-being and pleasurable satisfaction: enjoyment at sitting in the shade on a warm day. Delight is a high degree of pleasure, usually leading to active expression of it: delight at receiving a hoped-for letter. Joy is a feeling of delight so deep and so lasting that one radiates happiness and expresses it spontaneously: joy at unexpected good news. 5. voluptuousness. 8. preference, wish, inclination, predilection. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for pleasured
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Despite the hurt to his self-esteem of every moment spent with her, he pleasured in every such moment.

    Smoke Bellew Jack London
  • His body was what the dead man had most prized and pleasured, For in wombe was in god, Frag.

  • Full of dumb pain we pleasured our centuries with anticipation; we watched as we gamed away the hours.

    Melomaniacs James Huneker
  • Grant pleasured himself by reviewing his case in the most pessimistic light.

    Dust of the Desert Robert Welles Ritchie
  • He differed so from other men that her mind was pleasured with the thought he had descended from a larger sphere.

    The Pace That Kills Edgar Saltus
  • He was a slow-witted man, and he could devise no ready answer, no such cutting gibe as it would have pleasured him to administer.

    Love-at-Arms Raphael Sabatini
  • M. Valbonais has come, glancing up to see if it pleasured her young lady.

    A Little Girl in Old St. Louis Amanda Minnie Douglas
  • Moreover had We pleasured We had certainly raised up a warner in every city.

  • Graham asked, the while he pleasured in looking straight into the blue eyes that looked so straight into his.

British Dictionary definitions for pleasured


an agreeable or enjoyable sensation or emotion: the pleasure of hearing good music
something that gives or affords enjoyment or delight: his garden was his only pleasure
  1. amusement, recreation, or enjoyment
  2. (as modifier): a pleasure boat, pleasure ground
(euphemistic) sexual gratification or enjoyment: he took his pleasure of her
a person's preference or choice
when intr, often foll by in. to give pleasure to or take pleasure (in)
Derived Forms
pleasureful, adjective
pleasureless, adjective
Word Origin
C14 plesir, from Old French; related to Old French plaisir to please
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pleasured



late 14c., "condition of enjoyment," from Old French plesir, also plaisir "enjoyment, delight, desire, will" (12c.), from noun use of infinitive plaisir (v.) "to please," from Latin placere "to please, give pleasure, be approved" (see please (v.)). Ending altered in English 14c. by influence of words in -ure (measure, etc.). Meaning "sensual enjoyment as the chief object of life" is attested from 1520s.


1530s, "to take pleasure in;" 1550s as "give pleasure to," from pleasure (n.). Sexual sense by 1610s. Related: Pleasured; pleasuring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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