plunderous

plunder

[pluhn-der]
verb (used with object)
1.
to rob of goods or valuables by open force, as in war, hostile raids, brigandage, etc.: to plunder a town.
2.
to rob, despoil, or fleece: to plunder the public treasury.
3.
to take wrongfully, as by pillage, robbery, or fraud: to plunder a piece of property.
verb (used without object)
4.
to take plunder; pillage.
noun
5.
plundering, pillage, or spoliation.
6.
that which is taken in plundering; loot.
7.
anything taken by robbery, theft, or fraud.

Origin:
1620–30; < Dutch plunderen

plunderable, adjective
plunderer, noun
plunderingly, adverb
plunderous, adjective
unplundered, adjective
unplunderous, adjective
unplunderously, adverb


1. rape, ravage, sack, devastate. 5. rapine, robbery. 6. booty, spoils.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
plunder (ˈplʌndə)
 
vb
1.  to steal (valuables, goods, sacred items, etc) from (a town, church, etc) by force, esp in time of war; loot
2.  (tr) to rob or steal (choice or desirable things) from (a place): to plunder an orchard
 
n
3.  anything taken by plundering or theft; booty
4.  the act of plundering; pillage
 
[C17: probably from Dutch plunderen (originally: to plunder household goods); compare Middle High German plunder bedding, household goods]
 
'plunderable
 
adj
 
'plunderer
 
n
 
'plunderous
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

plunder
1632, from M.H.G. plunderen "to plunder," originally "to take away household furniture," from plunder "household goods, clothes" (cf. M.H.G. plunder "lumber, baggage," 14c.; M.Du. plunder "household goods;" Fris., Du. plunje "clothes"). A word acquired by English via the Thirty Years War and applied
in native use after the outbreak of the Civil War in 1642. The noun meaning "goods taken by force" is from 1647.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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