polity

[pol-i-tee]
noun, plural polities.
1.
a particular form or system of government: civil polity; ecclesiastical polity.
2.
the condition of being constituted as a state or other organized community or body: The polity of ancient Athens became a standard for later governments.
3.
government or administrative regulation: The colonists demanded independence in matters of internal polity.
4.
a state or other organized community or body.

Origin:
1530–40; < Latin polītīa < Greek polīteía citizenship, government, form of government, commonwealth, equivalent to polī́te-, variant stem of polī́tēs citizen (see polis, -ite1) + -ia -ia

policy, polity.
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World English Dictionary
polity (ˈpɒlɪtɪ)
 
n , pl -ties
1.  a form of government or organization of a state, church, society, etc; constitution
2.  a politically organized society, state, city, etc
3.  the management of public or civil affairs
4.  political organization
 
[C16: from Latin polītīa, from Greek politeia citizenship, civil administration, from politēs citizen, from polis city]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

polity
1538, from Fr. politie (1419), from L.L. polita "organized government" (see policy).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Generally captives appear to have been taken during war between polities.
Direct democracy can work only in small, relatively homogeneous polities.
The approach, method and objective of studying history cannot be the same in
  different polities.
He has said at various times that his book was above polities.
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