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pomander

[poh-man-der, poh-man-der] /ˈpoʊ mæn dər, poʊˈmæn dər/
noun
1.
a mixture of aromatic substances, often in the form of a ball, formerly carried on the person as a supposed guard against infection but now placed in closets, dressers, etc.
2.
the ball, box, or other case in which it was formerly carried.
Origin
late Middle English
obsolete English
1425-1475
1425-75; earlier pomaundre, pomemandre, late Middle English pomendambre < Middle French pome d'ambre (compare obsolete English pom(e)amber) < Medieval Latin pōmum ambrē (Latin ambrae) literally, apple of amber. See pome, amber
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for pomander
  • Create your own scented pomander decoration from oranges or lemons.
  • Make a citrus pomander by inserting cloves into the citrus fruit.
  • Make a citrus pomander by inserting cloves into the cit rus fruit.
British Dictionary definitions for pomander

pomander

/pəʊˈmændə/
noun
1.
a mixture of aromatic substances in a sachet or an orange, formerly carried as scent or as a protection against disease
2.
a container for such a mixture
Word Origin
C15: from Old French pome d'ambre, from Medieval Latin pōmum ambrae apple of amber
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Encyclopedia Article for pomander

small metal (sometimes china) container designed to hold a ball of aromatic spices or herbs. Worn suspended from neck or girdle or attached to the finger by a ring, it was believed to be a protection against infections and noxious smells. As fashionable jewelry in the late Middle Ages, pomanders were decorative objects often enriched with gems and enamels. Late in the 16th century, the original sphere shape was divided into several segments in order to accommodate a variety of powdered spices, and soon afterward pomanders in the form of dice, skulls, and books appeared.

Learn more about pomander with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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13
16
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