poplar

[pop-ler]
noun
1.
any of the rapidly growing, salicaceous trees of the genus Populus, usually characterized by the columnar or spirelike manner of growth of its branches.
2.
the light, soft wood of any of these trees, used for pulp.
3.
any of various similar trees, as the tulip tree.
4.
the wood of any such tree.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English popler(e), variant of populer, equivalent to Middle English, Old English popul popple2 (< Latin pōpulus poplar) + -er -er2; suffix apparently added on model of Middle French pouplier, equivalent to pouple poplar + -ier -ier2

poplared, adjective

poplar, popular.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
poplar (ˈpɒplə)
 
n
1.  aspen balsam poplar Lombardy poplar See also white poplar any tree of the salicaceous genus Populus, of N temperate regions, having triangular leaves, flowers borne in catkins, and light soft wood
2.  any of various trees resembling the true poplars, such as the tulip tree
3.  the wood of any of these trees
 
[C14: from Old French poplier, from pouple, from Latin pōpulus]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

poplar
1356, from Anglo-Norm. popler, from O.Fr. poplier (13c., Fr. peulplier), from L. populus "poplar" (with a long "o;" not the same word that produced popular). Perhaps related to Gk. pelea "elm." It. pioppo, Sp. chopo, Ger. pappel, O.C.S. topoli all are from L.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Poplar definition


Heb. libneh, "white", (Gen. 30:37; Hos. 4:13), in all probability the storax tree (Styrax officinalis) or white poplar, distinguished by its white blossoms and pale leaves. It is common in the Anti-Libanus. Other species of the poplar are found in Palestine, such as the white poplar (P. alba) of our own country, the black poplar (P. nigra), and the aspen (P. tremula). (See WILLOW.)

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
And another thought, about the yellow poplars, which turn yellow.
Growing poplars in plantations is challenging, and good establish-ment the first year is critical to long-term success.
Cankers on quaking aspen, branch cankers on white poplars, twig blight on big-tooth aspen.
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