postprison

prison

[priz-uhn]
noun
1.
a building for the confinement of persons held while awaiting trial, persons sentenced after conviction, etc.
3.
any place of confinement or involuntary restraint.

Origin:
before 1150; Middle English prison, earlier prisun < Old French, variant of preson imprisonment, a prison < Latin pre()nsiōn- (stem of prehēnsiō) a seizure, arrest, equivalent to prehēns(us) (past participle of prehendere to seize) + -iōn- -ion; doublet of prehension

prisonlike, adjective
postprison, adjective

jail, prison.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
prison (ˈprɪzən)
 
n
1.  jail penitentiary See also reformatory a public building used to house convicted criminals and accused persons remanded in custody and awaiting trial
2.  any place of confinement or seeming confinement
 
[C12: from Old French prisun, from Latin prēnsiō a capturing, from prehendere to lay hold of]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prison
c.1123, from O.Fr. prisoun "prison, imprisonment" (11c.), altered (by influence of pris "taken;" see prize (2)) from earlier preson, from L. prensionem (nom. prensio), shortening of prehensionem (nom. *prehensio) "a taking," noun of action from pp. stem of prehendere "to take" (see
prehensile). Captives taken in war were called prisoners since c.1350; phrase prisoner of war dates from 1678 (see also POW).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Prison definition


The first occasion on which we read of a prison is in the history of Joseph in Egypt. Then Potiphar, "Joseph's master, took him, and put him into the prison, a place where the king's prisoners were bound" (Gen. 39:20-23). The Heb. word here used (sohar) means properly a round tower or fortress. It seems to have been a part of Potiphar's house, a place in which state prisoners were kept. The Mosaic law made no provision for imprisonment as a punishment. In the wilderness two persons were "put in ward" (Lev. 24:12; Num. 15:34), but it was only till the mind of God concerning them should be ascertained. Prisons and prisoners are mentioned in the book of Psalms (69:33; 79:11; 142:7). Samson was confined in a Philistine prison (Judg. 16:21, 25). In the subsequent history of Israel frequent references are made to prisons (1 Kings 22:27; 2 Kings 17:4; 25:27, 29; 2 Chr. 16:10; Isa. 42:7; Jer. 32:2). Prisons seem to have been common in New Testament times (Matt. 11:2; 25:36, 43). The apostles were put into the "common prison" at the instance of the Jewish council (Acts 5:18, 23; 8:3); and at Philippi Paul and Silas were thrust into the "inner prison" (16:24; comp. 4:3; 12:4, 5).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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