pre-emption

preemption

[pree-emp-shuhn]
noun
the act or right of claiming or purchasing before or in preference to others.
Also, pre-emption.


Origin:
1595–1605; < Medieval Latin praeëmpt(us) bought beforehand (past participle of praeëmere) + -ion. See pre-, emptor

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To pre-emption
Collins
World English Dictionary
pre-emption (prɪˈɛmpʃən)
 
n
1.  law the purchase of or right to purchase property in advance of or in preference to others
2.  international law the right of a government to intercept and seize for its own purposes goods or property of the subjects of another state while in transit, esp in time of war
 
[C16: from Medieval Latin praeemptiō, from praeemere to buy beforehand, from emere to buy]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

pre-emption
c.1600, also preemption, lit. "the right of purchasing before others," from pre- "before" + L. emptionem (nom. emptio) "buying," from emere "to buy" (see exempt). Pre-empt (v.) is an 1855 back formation, originally Amer.Eng. In the broascasting sense, it is attested from
1965, Amer.Eng., a euphemism for "cancel."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;