predevotion

devotion

[dih-voh-shuhn]
noun
1.
profound dedication; consecration.
2.
earnest attachment to a cause, person, etc.
3.
an assignment or appropriation to any purpose, cause, etc.: the devotion of one's wealth and time to scientific advancement.
4.
Often, devotions. Ecclesiastical. religious observance or worship; a form of prayer or worship for special use.

Origin:
1150–1200; Middle English devocioun (< Anglo-French) < Late Latin dēvōtiōn- (stem of dēvōtiō), equivalent to Latin dēvōt(us) (see devote) + -iōn- -ion

predevotion, noun
superdevotion, noun


2. zeal, ardor. See love.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
devotion (dɪˈvəʊʃən)
 
n
1.  (often foll by to) strong attachment (to) or affection (for a cause, person, etc) marked by dedicated loyalty
2.  religious zeal; piety
3.  (often plural) religious observance or prayers

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

devotion
early 13c., from O.Fr. devocion, from L. devotionem, noun of action from devovere "dedicate by a vow," from de- "down, away" + vovere "to vow," from votum "vow" (see vow). In ancient L., "act of consecrating by a vow," also "loyalty, fealty, allegiance;" in Church Latin, "devotion
to God, piety." This was the original sense in English; the etymological sense, including secular situations, returned 16c. via Italian and French.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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