preelectric

electric

[ih-lek-trik]
adjective
1.
pertaining to, derived from, produced by, or involving electricity: an electric shock.
2.
producing, transmitting, or operated by electric currents: an electric bell; electric cord.
3.
electrifying; thrilling; exciting; stirring: The atmosphere was electric with excitement.
4.
a.
producing sound by electrical or electronic means: an electric piano.
b.
equipped with connections to an amplifier-loudspeaker system: an electric violin.
noun
5.
Railroads.
a.
an electric locomotive.
b.
Informal. a railroad operated by electricity.
6.
electricity: residential users of gas and electric.
7.
something, as an appliance, vehicle, or toy, operated by electricity.
8.
Archaic. a substance that is a nonconductor of electricity, as glass or amber, used to store or to excite an electric charge.

Origin:
1640–50; < Neo-Latin electricus, equivalent to Latin ēlectr(um) amber (see electrum) + -icus -ic

nonelectric, adjective, noun
preelectric, adjective
unelectric, adjective


3. spirited, rousing, dynamic.


3. dull, uninspired, prosaic.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
electric (ɪˈlɛktrɪk)
 
adj
1.  of, derived from, produced by, producing, transmitting, or powered by electricity: electric current; an electric cord; an electric blanket; an electric fence; an electric fire
2.  (of a musical instrument) amplified electronically: an electric guitar; an electric mandolin
3.  very tense or exciting; emotionally charged: an electric atmosphere
 
n
4.  informal an electric train, car, etc
5.  informal (Brit) electricity or electrical power
6.  (plural) an electric circuit or electric appliances
 

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

electric
1640s, first used in English by physician Sir Thomas Browne (1605-1682), coined in Mod.L. by English physicist William Gilbert (1540-1603) in treatise "De Magnete" (1600), from L. electrum "amber," from Gk. elektron "amber" (Homer, Hesiod, Herodotus), also "pale gold" (a compound of 1 part silver to
4 of gold); of unknown origin. The physical force so called because it first was generated by rubbing amber. Electric toothbrush first recorded 1936; electric typewriter 1958.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
electric (ĭ-lěk'trĭk) also electrical   (ĭ-lěk'trĭk)  Pronunciation Key 
Relating to or operated by electricity. Compare electronic.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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