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preempt

[pree-empt] /priˈɛmpt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to occupy (land) in order to establish a prior right to buy.
2.
to acquire or appropriate before someone else; take for oneself; arrogate:
a political issue preempted by the opposition party.
3.
to take the place of because of priorities, reconsideration, rescheduling, etc.; supplant:
The special newscast preempted the usual television program.
verb (used without object)
4.
Bridge. to make a preemptive bid.
5.
to forestall or prevent (something anticipated) by acting first; preclude; head off:
an effort to preempt inflation.
noun
6.
Bridge. a preemptive bid.
Also, pre-empt.
Origin
1840-1850
1840-50, Americanism; back formation from preemption
Related forms
preemptible, adjective
preemptor
[pree-emp-tawr, -ter] /priˈɛmp tɔr, -tər/ (Show IPA),
noun
preemptory
[pree-emp-tuh-ree] /priˈɛmp tə ri/ (Show IPA),
adjective
unpreempted, adjective
Synonyms
1. claim, appropriate, usurp.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for preempted
  • If state are preempted then they will likely lobby for credit for early reductions.
  • He had a bop that moved the crowd, and preempted beef.
  • Unfortunately, the event is preempted when time turns out to be cyclic.
  • At first in the modal system and later in the tonal system, harmony preempted the place of counterpoint.
  • We conclude that this landowner's state law action, removed to federal court based on diversity of citizenship, is not preempted.

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