prelusive

prelusive

[pri-loo-siv]
adjective
Also, prelusory [pri-loo-suh-ree] .


Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin praelūs(us) (see prelusion) + -ive

prelusively, prelusorily, adverb
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World English Dictionary
prelude (ˈprɛljuːd)
 
n
1.  a.  a piece of music that precedes a fugue, or forms the first movement of a suite, or an introduction to an act in an opera, etc
 b.  (esp for piano) a self-contained piece of music
2.  something serving as an introduction or preceding event, occurrence, etc
 
vb
3.  to serve as a prelude to (something)
4.  (tr) to introduce by a prelude
 
[C16: (n) from Medieval Latin praelūdium, from prae before + -lūdium entertainment, from Latin lūdus play; (vb) from Late Latin praelūdere to play beforehand, rehearse, from lūdere to play]
 
preluder
 
n
 
pre'ludial
 
adj
 
prelusion
 
n
 
prelusive
 
adj
 
prelusory
 
adj
 
pre'lusively
 
adv
 
pre'lusorily
 
adv

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