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premonition

[pree-muh-nish-uh n, prem-uh-] /ˌpri məˈnɪʃ ən, ˌprɛm ə-/
noun
1.
a feeling of anticipation of or anxiety over a future event; presentiment:
He had a vague premonition of danger.
2.
a forewarning.
Origin
late Middle English
1425-1475
1425-75; late Middle English premunicioun (cf. praemunire) < Late Latin praemonitiōn- (stem of praemonitiō) forewarning. See pre-, monition
Synonyms
1. foreboding, portent, omen, sign.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for premonitions
  • She also had premonitions as a human, which got her committed to an asylum, where she was later made a vampire.
  • He has researched several areas of parapsychology, in particular premonitions.
  • Nevertheless, there were premonitions of difference from the outset,even predating the first settlements.
British Dictionary definitions for premonitions

premonition

/ˌprɛməˈnɪʃən/
noun
1.
an intuition of a future, usually unwelcome, occurrence; foreboding
2.
an early warning of a future event; forewarning
Derived Forms
premonitory (prɪˈmɒnɪtərɪ; -trɪ) adjective
Word Origin
C16: from Late Latin praemonitiō, from Latin praemonēre to admonish beforehand, from prae before + monēre to warn, advise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for premonitions
premonition
1456, from Anglo-Fr. premunition, from L.L. præmonitionem (nom. præmonitio) "a forewarning," from L. præmonitius, pp. of præmonere "forewarn," from præ- "before" + monere "to warn" (see monitor).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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