preremorse

remorse

[ri-mawrs]
noun
1.
deep and painful regret for wrongdoing; compunction.
2.
Obsolete. pity; compassion.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Middle French remors < Medieval Latin remorsus, equivalent to Latin remord(ere) to bite again, vex, nag (re- re- + mordere to bite) + -tus suffix of v. action, with dt > s; see mordant

preremorse, noun


1. contrition. See regret.
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World English Dictionary
remorse (rɪˈmɔːs)
 
n
1.  a sense of deep regret and guilt for some misdeed
2.  compunction; pity; compassion
 
[C14: from Medieval Latin remorsus a gnawing, from Latin remordēre to bite again, from re- + mordēre to bite]
 
re'morseful
 
adj
 
re'morsefully
 
adv
 
re'morsefulness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

remorse
late 14c., from O.Fr. remors (Fr. remords), from M.L. remorsum, from neut. pp. of L. remordere "to vex, disturb," lit. "to bite back," from re- "again" + mordere "to bite" (see smart (v.)). The sense evolution was via the M.L. phrase remorsus conscientiæ (translated
into M.E. as ayenbite of inwit).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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