presumingly

presuming

[pri-zoo-ming]
adjective

Origin:
1575–85; presume + -ing2

presumingly, adverb
unpresuming, adjective
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World English Dictionary
presume (prɪˈzjuːm)
 
vb
1.  (when tr, often takes a clause as object) to take (something) for granted; assume
2.  (when tr, often foll by an infinitive) to take upon oneself (to do something) without warrant or permission; dare: do you presume to copy my work?
3.  (intr; foll by on or upon) to rely or depend: don't presume on his agreement
4.  law to take as proved until contrary evidence is produced
 
[C14: via Old French from Latin praesūmere to take in advance, from prae before + sūmere to assume]
 
presumedly
 
adv
 
pre'sumer
 
n
 
pre'suming
 
adj
 
pre'sumingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin & History

presume
late 14c., "to take upon oneself, to take liberty," also "to take for granted, presuppose," from O.Fr. presumer (12c.), from L. præsumere (see presumption). Presumptive is recorded from 1560s. The heir presumptive (1620s) is "presumed" to be the heir if the heir apparent is unavailable.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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