prickled

prickle

[prik-uhl]
noun
1.
a sharp point.
2.
a small, pointed process growing from the bark of a plant.
3.
a sharp process or projection, as from the skin of an animal; a spine.
4.
a pricking sensation.
verb (used with object), prickled, prickling.
5.
to prick lightly.
6.
to cause a pricking or tingling sensation in.
verb (used without object), prickled, prickling.
7.
to tingle as if pricked.

Origin:
before 950; Middle English prykel (noun), Old English pricel. See prick, -le

unprickled, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
prickle (ˈprɪkəl)
 
n
1.  botany Compare thorn a pointed process arising from the outer layer of a stem, leaf, etc, and containing no woody or conducting tissue
2.  a pricking or stinging sensation
 
vb
3.  to feel or cause to feel a stinging sensation
4.  (tr) to prick, as with a thorn
 
[Old English pricel; related to Middle Low German prekel, German Prickel]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prickle
O.E. pricel "thing to prick with," from the same source as O.E. prician (see prick) with W.Gmc. instrumental suffix *-islja (cf. M.L.G. prickel, Du. prikkel). Prickly "spiny, armed with prickles" is from 1578 (originally of holly leaves); fig. sense of "irritable" first recorded
1862. Prickly heat is from 1736, so called for the sensation; prickly pear is from 1760.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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