follow Dictionary.com

It’s about time. We are now on Instagram!

principle of sufficient reason

in the philosophy of the 17th- and 18th-century philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, an explanation to account for the existence of certain monads despite their contingency. Having ascribed to existent monads indestructibility, self-sufficiency, and imperviousness to extrinsic causality, Leibniz distinguished truths of reason, whose nonexistence would involve a contradiction, from truths of fact, whose existence depended on God's free choice. The actual existence of the latter is explained by the principle of sufficient reason, which asserts that there is an adequate reason to account for the existence and nature of everything that could conceivably not exist. In each such case, the ultimate sufficient reason is the free choice of God. This principle received various formulations from Leibniz and from later philosophers.

Learn more about principle of sufficient reason with a free trial on Britannica.com
Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Word Value for principle

15
20
Scrabble Words With Friends