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prize2

[prahyz] /praɪz/
verb (used with object), prized, prizing.
1.
to value or esteem highly.
2.
to estimate the worth or value of.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English prisen < Middle French prisier, variant of preisier to praise
Synonyms
1. See appreciate.

prize3

[prahyz] /praɪz/
verb (used with object), prized, prizing.
1.
pry2 .
noun
2.
3.
a lever.
Also, prise.
Origin
1350-1400; Middle English prise < Middle French: a hold, grasp < Latin pre()nsa. See prize1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for prized
  • Elephants are highly prized because of their tusks-people have commercialized the value of them.
  • Research money is not so easy to come by, and the ability to obtain it is highly prized.
  • Quick answers and production are prized, often at the expense of contemplation, that cherished academic value.
  • It should be recognized though, that learning isn't necessarily prized as an end in itself, but as a means to getting to the top.
  • Yet, they have been greatly prized by many fine critics.
  • The students prized these certificates highly, and they added greatly to the popularity of the night-school.
  • If it were possible to heal sorrow by weeping and to raise the dead with tears, gold were less prized than grief.
  • It runs counter to the idea, prized by geeks, that computing equals freedom.
  • With all the money you have invested in your collection, you shouldn't hide your prized sports memorabilia in boxes in the closet.
  • Their precision work and eye for detail create such highly prized items as blankets, saddles, hats and boots.
British Dictionary definitions for prized

prize1

/praɪz/
noun
1.
  1. a reward or honour for victory or for having won a contest, competition, etc
  2. (as modifier): prize jockey, prize essay
2.
something given to the winner of any game of chance, lottery, etc
3.
something striven for
4.
any valuable property captured in time of war, esp a vessel
Word Origin
C14: from Old French prise a capture, from Latin prehendere to seize; influenced also by Middle English prise reward; see price

prize2

/praɪz/
verb
1.
(transitive) to esteem greatly; value highly
Word Origin
C15 prise, from Old French preisier to praise

prize3

/praɪz/
verb, noun
1.
a variant spelling of prise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for prized
adj.

"highly esteemed," 1530s, adjective from prize (n.1.), or from past participle of Middle English prisen "to prize, value" (late 14c.), from stem of Old French preisier "to praise" (see praise (v.)).

prize

n.

"reward," prise (c.1300 in this sense), from Old French pris "price, value, worth; reward" (see price (n.)). As an adjective, "worthy of a prize," from 1803. The spelling with -z- is from late 16c. Prize-fighter is from 1703; prize-fight from 1730 (prize-fighter from 1785).

"something taken by force," mid-13c., prise "a taking, holding," from Old French prise "a taking, seizing, holding," noun use of fem. past participle of prendre "to take, seize," from Latin prendere, contraction of prehendere "lay hold of, grasp, seize, catch" (see prehensile). Especially of ships captured at sea (1510s). The spelling with -z- is from late 16c.

v.

"to estimate," 1580s, alteration of Middle English prisen "to prize, value" (late 14c.), from stem of Old French preisier "to praise" (see praise (v.)). Related: Prized; prizing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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