prize

2 [prahyz]
verb (used with object), prized, prizing.
1.
to value or esteem highly.
2.
to estimate the worth or value of.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English prisen < Middle French prisier, variant of preisier to praise


1. See appreciate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

prize

3 [prahyz]
verb (used with object), prized, prizing.
1.
pry2.
noun
3.
a lever.
Also, prise.


Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English prise < Middle French: a hold, grasp < Latin pre()nsa. See prize1

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
prize1 (praɪz)
 
n
1.  a.  a reward or honour for victory or for having won a contest, competition, etc
 b.  (as modifier): prize jockey; prize essay
2.  something given to the winner of any game of chance, lottery, etc
3.  something striven for
4.  any valuable property captured in time of war, esp a vessel
 
[C14: from Old French prise a capture, from Latin prehendere to seize; influenced also by Middle English prise reward; see price]

prize2 (praɪz)
 
vb
(tr) to esteem greatly; value highly
 
[C15 prise, from Old French preisier to praise]

prize3 (praɪz)
 
vb, —n
a variant spelling of prise

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

prize
"reward," 1590s, alteration of M.E. prise (c.1300 in this sense; see price). Prize-fighter is from 1703; prize-fight from 1824. Prized "highly esteemed" is from 1538.

prize
"something taken by force," late 14c., from O.Fr. prise "a taking, seizing, holding," prop. fem. pp. of prendre "to take, seize," from L. prendere, contraction of prehendere (see prehensile). Especially of ships captured at sea (1512).

prize
"to estimate," 1586, alteration of M.E. prisen "to prize, value," from stem of O.Fr. preisier (see praise).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Elephants are highly prized because of their tusks-people have commercialized
  the value of them.
Research money is not so easy to come by, and the ability to obtain it is
  highly prized.
Quick answers and production are prized, often at the expense of contemplation,
  that cherished academic value.
It should be recognized though, that learning isn't necessarily prized as an
  end in itself, but as a means to getting to the top.
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