pro-acquisition

acquisition

[ak-wuh-zish-uhn]
noun
1.
the act of acquiring or gaining possession: the acquisition of real estate.
2.
something acquired; addition: a recent acquisition to the museum.
3.
Linguistics. the act or process of achieving mastery of a language or a linguistic rule or element: child language acquisition; second language acquisition.

Origin:
1375–1425; Middle English adquisicioun, a(c)quisicion < Latin acquīsītiōn- (stem of acquīsītiō), equivalent to acquīsīt(us), past participle of acquīrere to acquire + -iōn- -ion

acquisitional, adjective
acquisitor [uh-kwiz-i-ter] , noun
preacquisition, noun
proacquisition, adjective
reacquisition, noun
superacquisition, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
acquisition (ˌækwɪˈzɪʃən)
 
n
1.  the act of acquiring or gaining possession
2.  something acquired
3.  a person or thing of special merit added to a group
4.  astronautics the process of locating a spacecraft, satellite, etc, esp by radar, in order to gather tracking and telemetric information
 
[C14: from Latin acquīsītiōn-, from acquīrere to acquire]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

acquisition
late 14c., "act of obtaining," from L. acquisitionem, from stem of acquirere "get in addition," from ad- "extra" + quærere "to seek to obtain" (see query). Meaning "thing obtained" is from late 15c. The vowel change of -ae- to -i- in Latin is due to a L. phonetic rule
involving unaccented syllables in compounds.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

acquisition ac·qui·si·tion (āk'wĭ-zĭsh'ən)
n.
The empirical demonstration in psychology of an increase in the strength of the conditioned response in successive trials in which the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are paired.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
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