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profound

[pruh-found] /prəˈfaʊnd/
adjective, profounder, profoundest.
1.
penetrating or entering deeply into subjects of thought or knowledge; having deep insight or understanding:
a profound thinker.
2.
originating in or penetrating to the depths of one's being; profound grief.
3.
being or going far beneath what is superficial, external, or obvious:
profound insight.
4.
of deep meaning; of great and broadly inclusive significance:
a profound book.
5.
pervasive or intense; thorough; complete:
a profound silence.
6.
extending, situated, or originating far down, or far beneath the surface:
the profound depths of the ocean.
7.
low:
a profound bow.
noun, Literary.
8.
something that is profound.
9.
the deep sea; ocean.
10.
depth; abyss.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin profundus deep, vast, equivalent to pro- pro-1 + fundus bottom (see found2)
Related forms
profoundly, adverb
profoundness, noun
unprofound, adjective
unprofoundly, adverb
Synonyms
1. deep, sagacious.
Antonyms
1. shallow, superficial.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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British Dictionary definitions for pro-found

profound

/prəˈfaʊnd/
adjective
1.
penetrating deeply into subjects or ideas: a profound mind
2.
showing or requiring great knowledge or understanding: a profound treatise
3.
situated at or extending to a great depth
4.
reaching to or stemming from the depths of one's nature: profound regret
5.
intense or absolute: profound silence
6.
thoroughgoing; extensive: profound changes
noun
7.
(archaic or literary) a great depth; abyss
Derived Forms
profoundly, adverb
profoundness, profundity (prəˈfʌndɪtɪ) noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French profund, from Latin profundus deep, from pro-1 + fundus bottom
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for pro-found

profound

adj.

c.1300, "characterized by intellectual depth," from Old French profund (12c., Modern French profond), from Latin profundus "deep, bottomless, vast," also "obscure; profound; immoderate," from pro- "forth" (see pro-) + fundus "bottom" (see fund (n.)). The literal and figurative senses both were in Latin, but English, having already deep, employed this word primarily in its figurative sense. Related: Profoundly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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