proaudience

audience

[aw-dee-uhns]
noun
1.
the group of spectators at a public event; listeners or viewers collectively, as in attendance at a theater or concert: The audience was respectful of the speaker's opinion.
2.
the persons reached by a book, radio or television broadcast, etc.; public: Some works of music have a wide and varied audience.
3.
a regular public that manifests interest, support, enthusiasm, or the like; a following: Every art form has its audience.
4.
opportunity to be heard; chance to speak to or before a person or group; a hearing.
5.
a formal interview with a sovereign, high officer of government, or other high-ranking person: an audience with the pope.
6.
the act of hearing, or attending to, words or sounds.

Origin:
1325–75; Middle English < Middle French < Latin audientia. See audient, -ence

proaudience, adjective


See collective noun.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To proaudience
Collins
World English Dictionary
audience (ˈɔːdɪəns)
 
n
1.  a group of spectators or listeners, esp at a public event such as a concert or play
2.  the people reached by a book, film, or radio or television programme
3.  the devotees or followers of a public entertainer, lecturer, etc; regular public
4.  an opportunity to put one's point of view, such as a formal interview with a monarch or head of state
 
[C14: from Old French, from Latin audientia a hearing, from audīre to hear]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

audience
late 14c., "the action of hearing," from O.Fr. audience, from L. audentia "a hearing, listening," from audientum (nom. audiens), prp. of audire "to hear," from PIE compound *au-dh- "to perceive physically, grasp," from base *au- "to perceive" (cf. Gk. aisthanesthai "to feel;" Skt. avih, Avestan avish
"openly, evidently;" O.C.S. javiti "to reveal"). Meaning "formal hearing or reception" is from late 14c.; that of "persons within hearing range, assembly of listeners" is from early 15c. (Fr. audience retains only the older senses). Sense transferred 1855 to "readers of a book." Audience-participation (adj.) first recorded 1940.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature