follow Dictionary.com

Capitol vs. capital? What's the difference?

procrastinate

[proh-kras-tuh-neyt, pruh-] /proʊˈkræs təˌneɪt, prə-/
verb (used without object), procrastinated, procrastinating.
1.
to defer action; delay:
to procrastinate until an opportunity is lost.
verb (used with object), procrastinated, procrastinating.
2.
to put off till another day or time; defer; delay.
Origin of procrastinate
1580-1590
1580-90; < Latin prōcrāstinātus (past participle of prōcrāstināre to put off until tomorrow, equivalent to prō- pro-1 + -crāstināre, derivative of crāstinus of tomorrow; crās tomorrow + -tinus suffix forming adjectives from temporal adverbs); see -ate1
Related forms
procrastinatingly, procrastinatively, adverb
procrastination, noun
procrastinative, procrastinatory
[proh-kras-tuh-nuh-tawr-ee, -tohr-ee, pruh-] /proʊˈkræs tə nəˌtɔr i, -ˌtoʊr i, prə-/ (Show IPA),
adjective
procrastinativeness, noun
procrastinator, noun
overprocrastination, noun
unprocrastinated, adjective
Synonyms
2. prolong, postpone.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for procrastinating
Historical Examples
  • Zealous statesmen perhaps did more mischief than anything in the Galaxy—with the possible exception of procrastinating soldiers.

    A Slave is a Slave Henry Beam Piper
  • It was not quick to move or easily excited; but stolid, cautious, unambitious, procrastinating.

    Laws Plato
  • She knew, as well as anyone, that she was lazy and procrastinating in the city.

    Natalie: A Garden Scout Lillian Elizabeth Roy
  • The last had passed like the others in procrastinating from hour to hour.

    Madame Bovary Gustave Flaubert
  • The British agents suspected that the Vermonters were procrastinating to save themselves from an invasion by king or Congress.

    Vermont Rowland E. Robinson
  • If you are one of the procrastinating kind, start in at once and get over it.

    Nuggets of the New Thought William Walker Atkinson,
  • They are neither easy, credulous and impulsive nor suspicious, obstinate and procrastinating.

    Analyzing Character Katherine M. H. Blackford and Arthur Newcomb
  • Oh, this procrastinating mail, and this procrastinating post-office!

  • The last had passed like the others, in procrastinating from hour to hour.

    Madame Bovary Gustave Flaubert
  • You say I am always either too precipitate or too procrastinating.

British Dictionary definitions for procrastinating

procrastinate

/prəʊˈkræstɪˌneɪt; prə-/
verb
1.
(usually intransitive) to put off or defer (an action) until a later time; delay
Derived Forms
procrastination, noun
procrastinator, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin prōcrāstināre to postpone until tomorrow, from pro-1 + crās tomorrow
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for procrastinating

procrastinate

v.

1580s, a back formation from procrastination or else from Latin procrastinatus, past participle of procrastinare "to put off till tomorrow; defer, delay" (see procrastination). Related: Procrastinated; procrastinating. Earlier verb was procrastine (1540s), from French.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for procrastinate

Few English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for procrastinating

20
25
Scrabble Words With Friends